San Francisco (Monday, August 11)

I had intended to swing by the SUP building (having passed it while a passenger in my friend’s car) first thing in the morning to get a closer look at it. A late start and a glance at MarineTraffic.com squashed that idea.

Ooo Manoa arrival! Time to make my way back to the waterfront. (Yes, I am a sad ship geek.)

I found the solar powered MUNI bus stop shelters fascinating:

bus shelter

We need stuff like this here in Hawai‘i.

I got off the bus and waited for a cable car.

One going in the opposite direction from where I wanted to go:

cable car

I know. Touristy. But, hey, it’s fun!

Across the street from Hyde Street Pier:

across the street from Hyde St Pier

Sadly, the Park store is no longer there in the building on the corner. I remember happily stocking up on nautical books when I visited while it was still open. It’s a shame, really.

And…there’s Manoa!

Manoa Golden Gate Bridge

Manoa

I’m so used to seeing her in Honolulu Harbor, it’s nice to see her in San Francisco Bay for a change. (It’s that perspective thing.)

I had quite a bit of time before my 1300 appointment at the Research Center, so I lingered to do more ship spotting.

APL Philippines:

APL Philippines

USCGC Bertholf:

USCGC Bertholf

Sirius Voyager:

Sirius Voyager

Seal (as opposed to sea lion) spotting:

seal

On the way to get something to eat, I stopped at the Aquatic Park Bathhouse building to see if there was anything new. On the street level, some things had been moved around. There was also an exhibit on the history of the U.S. Customs Service.

The upper floor was still sadly underutilized. Apart from the radio exhibit, there was only a display of some photos related to the America’s Cup (not my cup of tea).

Some details:

wheel light fixture

Plimsoll line on pillar

davits on pillar

After lunch, it was a short and pleasant walk over to Fort Mason, for the “work” part of my trip. I went to check out what FOC materials the NPS has. I must say the three hours I was there went by all too quickly.

One of the reference photos (not the greatest because of my shadow) I was allowed to take with the fancy phone:

FOC pic sample

Building E at the Fort Mason complex:

Fort Mason Bldg E

The stern of the brigantine Galilee in the parking lot area:

brigantine Galilee

After leaving Fort Mason, I went back to Hyde Street Pier.

Crane for the work being done on the pier:

crane for pier work

Shhhhhhhh…One of the highlights of my vacation was being allowed to go aboard Eppleton Hall or “Eppie,” as she is fondly called.

engines

frames 1

frames 2

Consett mark on frame

skylight

stern

The familiar-looking details were strangely comforting.

CA Thayer (ongoing work):

CA Thayer

Balclutha:

Balclutha bow

Another shot showing repairs (doubler plates) to the hull:

Balclutha repairs to hull

Holiday Ship Spotting

While other people were at the beach or the park for the 4th of July holiday, I was at the harbor. Yeah, ship nerd with no life. :P

It’s a good thing that I checked the schedule when I woke up, as things had changed. I would have been very sad had I arrived at the harbor at the time I had originally planned to.

I made it just in time to catch Horizon Reliance (a rare daytime opportunity):

Horizon Reliance

Mamo at the bow:

Mamo Horizon Reliance

Mikioi at the stern:

Mikioi Horizon Reliance

Leaving the harbor:

Horizon Reliance heading out

Not the best photo of Clipper Skagen, but I like the view of the Wai‘anae range in the background:

Clipper Skagen

USCGC Rush dressed for the holiday:

USCGC Rush dressed

A trio (parents and youngster?) of fairy terns soaring gracefully over the water:

trio of terns

Mamo and Mikioi heading out to the next job (tanker Morning Haruka in the distance):

next job

Morning Haruka at the Horizon terminal:

Morning Haruka

Stern lines:

Morning Haruka mooring lines

Longshoremen taking care of things on the pier:

longshoremen

Attempting to set up the rat guards:

Morning Haruka rat guard fail

It was rather gusty so he couldn’t get them in place on the lines. He ended up just leaving them hanging loose.

Mikioi again:

Mikioi

And Mamo:

Mamo

Captain Al Dorflinger boarding the pilot boat:

Captain Dorflinger

Mahimahi:

Mahimahi

On to another tanker, Jag Lalit:

Jag Lalit offshore

Approaching the anchorage (D):

Jag Lalit bow view

Anchor lowered:

Jag Lalit anchor lowered

Different view of the bow:

Jag Lalit bow

Captain Sinclair Brown disembarking:

Captain Brown

A hearty thanks to all the mariners working during the holiday.

Mahalo to Paul and Captains Dorflinger and Brown.

Rainy Days and…Saturdays

Hanging around…but not frowning.

A quick look around the ship before heading to Pier 9 to get pics of USCGC Polar Star:

USCGC Polar Star

Earlier in the year, the icebreaker was asked to aid in operations to free the ice-bound ships Akademik Shokalskiy and Xue Long before conditions improved and they managed to free themselves.

U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Polar Star stands down from Antarctic rescue

Satsumaseiun Maru crew looking on:

Satsumaseiun Maru crew looking on

Mikioi assisting:

Mikioi at bow Polar Star

Back on the ship, I spent part of the time tidying up the fo’c’sle.

There was dirt and debris from the fo’c’sle head plywood project that hadn’t been cleaned up. :(

fo'c'sle dirt

Like the muck in the waterways, it was bothering me.

Soooo…I took care of it:

fo'c'sle cleaned 1

fo'c'sle cleaned 2

As usual, there was the temptation to have a closer look at things in the area.

One of the port hawseholes:

port hawsehole

Got some different views of things by sticking my fancy phone out through the hawsehole.

Bottom edge of trailboard with the part of the “D” and the “E” in “Clyde”:

trailboard

Part of the hull and the towing cable:

hull and towing cable

Draft marks:

hull draft marks

After measuring the ullages, I was ready to go, but it started raining. I decided to stay on the pier and wait until the rain abated a bit.

Mokihana was turning off of Pier 7.

Rain water pouring from a scupper:

water from scupper

(The pic looks grainy because of the rain.)

Mokihana’s stern looking rather ghostly as she headed out of the harbor, and a fishing boat, less so:

ghostly Mokihana and fishing boat

The rain eventually stopped and it was time to go.

More Ship Spotting

More time on the pilot boat!

On the way out of the harbor, the Coast Guard working on a buoy:

Coast Guard working on buoy

Captain Ed Enos getting ready to go aboard Coral Bay:

Capt Enos Coral Bay

Pi‘ilani:

Pi‘ilani

Mikioi:

Mikioi

Mega yacht Vava II

Vava II

(Just a small fraction of what it cost to build this yacht would be nice to help FOC.)

Jean Anne

Jean Anne

Coral Bay at the pier:

Coral Bay

Coral Bay rat guards:

Coral Bay rat guards

Hachinohe Maru, a wood chip ship:

Hachinohe Maru

Thanks to Captain Ed Enos!

Another Saturday at the Harbor

I bought more baubles for the ship:

more baubles

I found something new on the deck. A maraschino cherry + ants!

maraschino cherry

(No, it wasn’t from our party.)

The Coast Guard folks were doing some sort of drill:

Coast Guard boats

Some of the additional baubles on the poop deck rail.

baubles poop deck rail

(Yeah, the varnish needs work.)

Having nearly slipped down the gangway on a couple of occasions, I was happy to help put on the non-skid material:

non skid

At the end of the pier, a beautiful electric blue…something. Omilu, I think?

mystery fish poss omilu

Spot the crocodile needlefish:

crocodile needlefish

Anole peeking out from a capstan on the pier:

Anole in capstan

Structure at Pier 19…home of the whale buses:

pier 19 home of whale bus

I asked if I could tag along with Paul on the pilot boat.

Here’s Paul on board Honolulu:

Paul pilot boat

Passing by USCGC Polar Star, an icebreaker:

USCGC Polar Star

I’ve been testing out the fancy phone camera. It’s certainly handy, but the image quality can’t quite compare with the old Nikon.

Maui:

Maui

Celebrity Century leaving:

Celebrity Century

Detail:

alongside Celebrity Century

Preparing the pilot ladder:

pilot ladder ready

Pau for the evening:

Paul with Honolulu

Mahalo to Paul, Captain Barry Solywoda, and Captain Lenny Stenback.

Brief Visit

I spent about an hour at the harbor this morning doing a bit of ship spotting.

Kawika zipping by after taking the pilot out to the Chinese research vessel Hai Yang Liu Hao:

Kawika

Hai Yang Liu Hao arriving in the harbor with a rainbow:

Hai Yang Liu Hao

Also arriving was USCGC Sequoia:

Sequoia

The deck crane says “Black Pearl of the Pacific.” Wonder if the other two buoy tenders (Walnut and Kukui) have words on their cranes as well?

Not a ship, but fun. Green whale bus!

green whale bus

Sunday Adventure

Another pleasant afternoon off the south coast of O‘ahu.

In previous posts, I touched on my fondness for looking at things from different perspectives. This post continues on with that.

Hello R.J. Pfeiffer!

RJ Pfeiffer

I’ve seen the Pfeiffer in the harbor (and had the honor of piping for her, oh, what seems like a lifetime ago), but it’s pretty cool to see her out at sea.

There goes Kawika after taking the pilot out to the ship:

Kawika

Heading into the harbor:

RJ Pfeiffer heading in

The USCGC Kittiwake was speeding along but slowed down…

Kittiwake

Uh oh. For a few moments, we wondered if we had violated some maritime rule we didn’t know about. Glad to see the ship go on her way into the harbor. We headed off toward Diamond Head.

Mystery bird:

what bird

And it’s actually in focus! Too bad it was so far away and heading away from the boat, so no ID.

All good things must come to an end and it was time to return to the Ala Wai.

A little while back, my friend went on a trip. When she returned, she found she was playing host to a new family: Unexpected Guests

The youngsters came back to visit:

the youngsters linger

Level horizons courtesy of Photoshop.