Away From Land

My land-based existence proved to be a bit of a downer this past Saturday. It wasn’t the best way to end a busy week.

As usual, I sought solace at the harbor.

I left the house early (still dark) Sunday morning because a ship I wanted to see was supposed to leave at 0700.

“Here comes the sun, and I say it’s all right…”

sunrise

Fresh air, calm sea, clear sky, quiet pier. How can one not feel at peace?

peaceful harbor

I even had a little friend to keep me company for a little while!

dove

0700 came and went. No Seiyo Pioneer. Hm.

That’s okay. There was the tanker Hai Soon 39:

Hai Soon 39

Since it was such a nice day and I wasn’t ready to head home, I went to Kewalo Basin.

I was sad to see that the old Fisherman’s Wharf restaurant had been reduced to a few piles of rubble:

Fisherman's Wharf rubble

I guess it was really showing its age, but still…

I still didn’t want to go home, so I asked if I could ride along on the pilot boat for the afternoon Matson job (Manoa arrival).

Needs a bit of rust-busting:

needs some paint

This trip was a bit special as Manoa was sporting a Christmas tree!

Manoa with Christmas tree

(Yes, she was carrying a shipment of trees.)

A closer look at the tree:

tree

Mikioi at the bow:

Mikioi

Pi‘ilani:

Pi‘ilani

Turning the ship:

Manoa stern

I got to see Seiyo Pioneer after all:

Seiyo Pioneer

Pi‘ilani at the stern with the crew on the ship waiting to lower the line:

Pi‘ilani and Seiyo Pioneer

Leaving the harbor behind:

Seiyo Pioneer hull looking back

Pilot ladder set up on the port side, taken from pilot boat Kawika with Captain Fikes Mauia at the wheel:

view from Kawaika

Mahalo to Captains Tom Heberle and Al Dorflinger. Special thanks to Captain Mauia for making the good shots possible and for the interesting conversation.

A side note—Captain Mauia also rescued this shearwater that he saw in the water in the harbor. It was unable to get airborne.

shearwater

Good job!

ETA: Please see the graphic below from the Hawai‘i Wildlife Center for information about how you can help save downed seabirds.

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