Unexpected Morning Ride

A cloudy/rainy morning at the harbor.

Mare Fox at Pier 1:

Mare Fox

A bit too far away for good photos, but nice to see two ‘iwa flying around:

two iwa

Barge Hilo Bay and tugs Capt Les Easom and Salishan:

Hilo Bay and tugs

Mikioi and Pi‘ilani headed out to assist Manoa:

Mikioi and Pi‘ilani

The reality of the port side of Falls of Clyde. Spot the ‘a‘ama (Thin-shelled rock crab):

Mr A‘ama crab

Kulamanu (ex-Rella Mae) detail:

Kulamanu

The Kulamanu is another ship being forced out of the harbor.

One of the Tiger tugs now in Foss livery as Freedom:

Freedom

Manoa:

Manoa

SPM:

SPM

Admiral’s Barge still hauled out, but looking good:

Admiral's Barge

Mahalo to Paul and Captain Collins.

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Very Much Appreciated!

After a few rough weeks, it was wonderful to be allowed to tag along with Captain Enos on the Horizon Reliance job. There is nothing like being out on the water.

On board Honolulu:

Capt Enos on Honolulu

Horizon Reliance:

Horizon Reliance

I love the lines of these old LASH ships!

Pi‘ilani:

sunset Piilani

Mikioi:

Mikioi

P & R boats in the harbor:

P&R boats

Horizon Reliance turning in the basin:

Horizon Reliance turning basin

The Admiral’s Barge (from Pearl Harbor) hauled out on PSI’s dry dock:

Admiral's Barge hauled out

Had a rough week too?

long day

Thanks to Captain Ed Enos and Paul. Feel much better.

Fanfare, Cattleya Ace, and Tugs

Another morning at the harbor 😀

Canoes crossing the channel:

canoes crossing channel

Namahoe after hauling fuel barge over to Pride of America:

Namahoe

Reflection on hull of Fanfare:

Fanfare reflection on hull

Finally leaving after spending a week in the harbor:

Fanfare leaving

Cattleya Ace also ready to leave:

Cattleya Ace

Malama being hauled out:

Malama in dry dock

Tira Lani arriving alongside Cattleya Ace:

Tira Lani

Mamo Tira Lani Cattleya Ace

Old line recycled as chafing gear:

Cattleya Ace chafing gear

Captain Brown and Cattleya Ace crew members:

Capt Brown Cattleya Ace

Ocean Pathfinder:

Ocean Pathfinder

Last, but not least, the very cute Weeks tug, Roberta G.

Roberta G

Mahalo to Captains Dorflinger and Brown. Thanks to Paul.

Waiting for the Dawn and an Ending

Thanks to a heads up from Captain Ed Enos, I was able to make it down to the harbor to catch the final journey of Pacific Shipyards International’s (PSI) dry dock Kāpilipono.

In “better” days:

13 06.09 PSI lg drydock 01 sm

Resting on the bottom after she sank last year:

Kapilipono down

I arrived at the harbor while it was still dark.

Japanese training ships Tosakaien Maru and Hokuho Maru at Pier 9:

Tosakaien Maru Hokuho Maru

The cruise ships usually arrive early in the morning. Here’s Ruby Princess:

Ruby Princess

Not the greatest photo, but here comes the sun (and I say it’s all right):

sunrise

Tying up Ruby Princess at Pier 10/11:

shore gang mooring lines

Clear and calm water (Tosakaien Maru bow):

Tosakaien Maru bow

Fellow photographer on board Ruby Princess:

getting the shot from Ruby Princess

View down the channel:

morning light

After a bit of a wait, Kāpilipono appeared, towed by Manuokekai and assisted by Mamo and Mikioi.

Passing the Matson gantry cranes:

passing by Matson gantry cranes

Manuokekai Kapilipono

Kapilipono

The tugs were joined by Hoku Loa before passing Aloha Tower. At this point I was very lucky to be invited to hop on the pilot boat.

The Coast Guard making sure everything is all right:

Coast Guard boat

Mikioi on the port side:

Mikioi assisting

Captain Enos up on the dry dock wall:

Capt Enos

Leaving the harbor with Ruby Princess and Aloha Tower in the background:

Kapilipono Ruby Princess Aloha Tower

heading out of the harbor

Manuokekai ahead:

Manuokekai

Hoku Loa astern:

Hoku Loa

One could not have asked for a better day. Sunny, clear, and calm.

Aloha, Kāpilipono:

towing out to sea

She was towed 12 miles offshore and scuttled.

Meanwhile, life continued on in the harbor.

Miyagi Maru, waiting offshore while Kāpilipono was being towed out, was finally able to enter the harbor:

Miyagi Maru

Kwai at the pier, almost ready to leave with a load of cargo:

Kwai stern detail

Containers being unloaded from Matson’s Haleakala:

Haleakala

Ocean Pathfinder arrived with a barge:

Ocean Pathfinder

Ice for the fishing boats:

ice for fishing boats

Literally, a cool job.

Moving containers:

moving containers

containers on barge

Mahalo to Captain Enos, Captain Collins, and Paul.

Change is Needed – Comments on the Latest from the Friends of Falls of Clyde

The following is a message that was recently posted on Facebook by Bruce McEwan, the president of the Friends of Falls of Clyde (FFOC):

“Friends of Falls of Clyde met with the Deputy Director of Harbors Division today. He wants a commitment as to when we will complete our fundraiser for the drydock cost of $1.5 million. We have asked for the year 2016 to complete our fundraiser and get the ship into drydock. He is taking our request ‘under advisement,’ but we will not know the exact timing until we hear from him. The message is clear, we MUST meet our goal as soon as possible. While we have grant applications pending and some to submit, we need to show that we have grassroot support from individual donors. Supporters need to donate now to show that this is an achievable and worthwhile goal. Go to Indiegogo or directly to our website ate [sic] http://www.friendsoffallsofclyde.org.”

Those of you who follow my blog, know of my past involvement with the FFOC and understand how much I love the ship and want to see her restored to her former glory. It’s been about a year since I resigned from the FFOC board and it has been an interesting (and distressing/depressing) time as an outsider looking in.

Mr. McEwan says the “message is clear.” Indeed, it is. The FFOC board has not learned from past missteps and continues to tread the same path.

A project on the scale of preserving and ultimately restoring the Falls of Clyde takes time, commitment, and passion. Has the FFOC board been doing all it can?

Supporters are being called on to step up. What are the board members doing to step up their game? Where is their presence in the sailing ship/historic ship communities? What are they doing to network and to learn what it takes to dry dock a ship like Falls of Clyde, given the fact that NONE of them have the practical experience needed?* What is the board doing to gain more local waterfront support?

There appears to be no PR or marketing plan. What effort is there to really win grassroots support? How is the new Indiegogo campaign going to be different from the last one? What is the compelling message that will inspire people to reach into their pockets, AGAIN, to give hard earned money to the organization? How is the call for action being spread outside of Facebook and the organization website? Social media can be a powerful tool if used correctly.

The FFOC needs to do a better job of reaching out and informing people. Don’t assume that the general public knows what is happening. I run into people on the waterfront who ask me what is going on and get emails and other forms of e-messages from folks looking for more information.

Why is there no steady/weekly presence on the ship? People have commented to me that they never see anyone doing any work on board the ship. I have to agree. I am at the harbor on a weekly basis, and rarely see anyone. Basic maintenance is important. More effort should be made to do it. After I left the organization, a board member bragged to me that they had a number of volunteers lined up? Where are they? If the board members can’t be bothered to spare time for the ship, how can they ask others to do the same? Board members, how much of a priority is the ship in your lives?

There are technical issues that still haven’t been addressed. Also, it would be a good idea to learn how to do the basic technical stuff and not rely on others. Just saying.

There are two words that come to mind that describe the current board. I won’t say them at this point. However, I will say that it is painfully obvious that it is time for fresh blood, new ideas, and people who are willing and able to sacrifice time and put in the effort to save the ship.

Time is running out.

(I feel like a broken record.)

*They should be reaching out to the folks at South Street Seaport and scheduling a visit to observe the work being done on Wavertree.

Checking Out Pacific Tracker and Other Things

Down at the harbor to watch Pacific Tracker depart from Pier 10.

Pilot arriving:

Kawika approaching

I was invited to ride along on the pilot boat for the job. 🙂 We took a short spin around the harbor while waiting for the ship to unmoor.

Stern view of Kulamanu:

Kulamanu

Graphic on USCGC Kukui’s buoy crane:

Kukui detail

PSI’s larger dry dock, Kapilipono, still down:

PSI drydock down

Bridle chain marks on Hilo Bay:

Hilo Bay chain marks

The harbor water was a rather ugly brown color due to rainwater runoff:

brown water runoff

Tacoma Trader:

Tacoma Trader

The resident female ‘iwa:

iwa

Pacific Tracker:

Pacific Tracker

Pacific Tracker headed out

Pi‘ilani (Captain Schade):

Pi‘ilani

Mikioi:

Mikioi

Pi‘ilani at Pacific Tracker’s bow:

Pacific Tracker Pi‘ilani

Captain Tom Heberle disembarking:

Capt Heberle

Mahalo to Captain Heberle and Paul. 🙂

San Francisco Ship Spotting – Morning

Last week, I had the opportunity to visit San Francisco for a few days for work.

On Thursday, I was supposed to meet my co-worker at 1000 at the Exploratorium. Waking up super early, I was able to squeeze in a bit of ship spotting to start off the day.

First stop was the old Matson Building on Market Street.

Matson Building

Nautical motif:

Matson Building detail

I walked over to the Ferry Building and boarded the ferry to Alameda.

I had noted (via the MarineTraffic app) that Lihue would be arriving and I was hoping to see her at the Matson terminal.

As the ferry pulled away from the pier, I could see Lihue approaching the Bay Bridge.

tug waiting for Lihue

Talk about good timing! (Yeah, I’m a nut. I hope no one saw the mad grin on my face.)

Looking back at the city:

San Francisco from ferry

Royal Melbourne pushing tank barge Bernie Briere:

tank barge Bernie Briere Royal Melbourne

Oakland gantry cranes:

Oakland gantry cranes

Passing Kauai at the Matson terminal:

find the seagull Kauai

Kauai

It was great to finally see HMB-1, now owned by Bay Ship, at Alameda:

HMB-1 at Bay Ship

Sigh. What could have been…

Schnitzer Steel facility:

Schnitzer Steel yard

More old friends, Matsonia and Moku Pahu:

Matsonia Moku Pahu

Commuters on board, it was time to head back to San Francisco.

Here’s Lihue!

Lihue

She had some problems related to her engines back in Honolulu, which delayed her departure. Glad she made it to the Bay Area safely.

(She’s currently back in Honolulu. 🙂 )

Sandra Hugh (same class as Pi‘ilani?) assisting:

Sandra Hugh

Goodbye Oakland:

returning to San Francisco

I saw a dolphin and tried to get a photo, but it didn’t turn out (can only see the top of its dorsal fin).

Passing under the Bay Bridge:

Bay Bridge

Back on land, a view of the Ferry Building:

Ferry Building

At anchor:

at anchor

Pilot boat San Francisco heading out:

pilot boat San Francisco

Posing seagull:

seagull

More to come…